Upper house

The request of the MeToo movement: a new deal at work

It is tempting to look back pessimistically on the extraordinary MeToo movement in India that started in early October three years ago. What have women gained? An editor, accused of sexual harassment by 22 women, filed a libel claim against one of them, lost in court and exercised his legal right to appeal the decision to a higher court. His career prospects are bright.

A junior judicial assistant, whose charges against the sitting Chief Justice of India (CJI), led to an internal investigation and a swift exoneration by her peers has been reinstated in her post. The former CJI finds itself in the Upper House of Parliament.

A Mumbai court has dismissed rape charges against a so-called sanskari (cultured) film actor, claiming that the possibility that he was “falsely accused” could not be excluded.

Who would have thought that breaking the silence would cost so much?

“Not all of the charges led to justice or even closure,” Justice Sujata V Manohar, one of the three Supreme Court justices who drafted the landmark Vishaka judgment that led to our laws against sexual harassment at work, in an interview in 2019. But, the movement showed, she said, that it is “at least possible for women to complain about what they cannot not in the past “.

Was the movement faulty? Indeed, it was. In a country where over 90% of employed women work in the informal sector, where were the voices of factory workers, caregivers, farm workers, women on construction sites and brick kilns? Where were the LGBTQ + voices? Dalit voices? Also, despite #BelieveAllWomen, not all of the accusations fall under the harassment section of the workplace.

But the success of the movement does not lie so much in the appeal of individual male bosses, as in its most basic demand for a new deal at work. Speaking, the women, although the privileged women, signaled that he could no longer continue as if nothing had happened. A workplace designed for men where women have to ‘bend over’ and never complain for fear of being labeled ‘whiners’, not showing ambition for fear of being labeled ‘aggressive’ ( and worse), not asking for a raise without being labeled “insistent” was untenable. For me, this is the most radical idea of ​​the MeToo movement.

Smarter workplaces have recognized this and have embarked on a course correction. Some have struggled to ensure legal compliance (maternity leave, internal complaints committees). Others have gone further by organizing gender awareness training and ensuring greater representation. It still leaves out the vast majority of employed women, but it is a start.

MeToo also has a strong message for women, that of solidarity and a continuum. Feminist organization dates back to the reform movements of the 19th century. It was not always united, but we saw its effectiveness through the anti-rape and anti-dowry movements of the 1970s and 1980s until the anti-rape upsurge of 2012. We know that we are linked to the past. We know we are not alone.

Namita Bhandare writes on gender Opinions expressed are personal

It’s tempting to look back pessimistically on the extraordinary MeToo movement in India that started in early October three years ago. What have women gained? An editor, accused of sexual harassment by 22 women, filed a libel claim against one of them, lost in court and exercised his legal right to appeal the decision to a higher court. His career prospects are bright.

A junior judicial assistant, whose charges against the sitting Chief Justice of India (CJI), led to an internal investigation and a swift exoneration by her peers has been reinstated in her post. The former CJI finds itself in the Upper House of Parliament.

A Mumbai court has dismissed rape charges against a so-called sanskari (cultured) film actor, claiming that the possibility that he was “falsely accused” could not be excluded.

Who would have thought that breaking the silence would cost so much?

“Not all of the charges led to justice or even closure,” Justice Sujata V Manohar, one of the three Supreme Court justices who drafted the landmark Vishaka judgment that led to our laws against sexual harassment at work, in an interview in 2019. But, the movement showed, she said, that it is “at least possible for women to complain about what they cannot not in the past “.

Was the movement faulty? Indeed, it was. In a country where over 90% of employed women work in the informal sector, where were the voices of factory workers, caregivers, farm workers, women on construction sites and brick kilns? Where were the LGBTQ + voices? Dalit voices? Also, despite #BelieveAllWomen, not all of the accusations fall under the harassment section of the workplace.

But the success of the movement does not lie so much in the appeal of individual male bosses, as in its most basic demand for a new deal at work. Speaking, the women, although the privileged women, signaled that he could no longer continue as if nothing had happened. A workplace designed for men where women have to “bend over” and never complain for fear of being labeled “whiners”, not showing ambition for fear of being labeled “aggressive” ( and worse), not asking for a raise without being labeled “insistent” was untenable. For me, this is the most radical idea of ​​the MeToo movement.

Smarter workplaces have recognized this and have embarked on a course correction. Some have struggled to ensure legal compliance (maternity leave, internal complaints commissions). Others have gone further by organizing gender awareness training and ensuring greater representation. It still leaves out the vast majority of employed women, but it is a start.

MeToo also has a strong message for women, that of solidarity and a continuum. Feminist organization dates back to the reform movements of the 19th century. It was not always united, but we saw its effectiveness through the anti-rape and anti-dowry movements of the 1970s and 1980s until the anti-rape upsurge of 2012. We know that we are linked to the past. We know we are not alone.

Namita Bhandare writes on gender Opinions expressed are personal


Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.