Legislature

NC governor and legislature let retired state workers down

OPINION AND COMMENT

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Senate Leader Phil Berger hits Governor Roy Cooper after his April 2021 state-of-the-state address as <a class=House Speaker Tim Moore looks on. The state budget the three negotiated this year did not include cost-of-living adjustment increases for retired state workers. Instead, they will receive one-off supplements.” title=”Senate Leader Phil Berger hits Governor Roy Cooper after his April 2021 state-of-the-state address as House Speaker Tim Moore looks on. The state budget the three negotiated this year did not include cost-of-living adjustment increases for retired state workers. Instead, they will receive one-off supplements.” loading=”lazy”/>

Senate Leader Phil Berger hits Governor Roy Cooper after his April 2021 state-of-the-state address as House Speaker Tim Moore looks on. The state budget the three negotiated this year did not include cost-of-living adjustment increases for retired state workers. Instead, they will receive one-off supplements.

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NC retirees

I want to call the North Carolina Legislature and Governor Roy Cooper for throwing retirees under the bus again. It has been over a decade since retirees have benefited from a significant increase in the cost of living. Instead, we are given ridiculous “bonuses” and empty talk.

It is a shameful abandonment of the commitment we were promised to serve, some of us in dangerous and unpleasant situations. I was a former North Carolina prison psychologist.

The value of our retirement payments has lost considerable purchasing power over these years, some say as much as 16%

Once again, in a year of plenty, we are helpless. Shame on the leaders of the NC to have failed again and again to their devoted servants. For some retirees, this actually means choices between medicine, food, electricity or heat.

Michael J. Trangaris, Francestown, NH

Society taxes

The proposal to eliminate corporate taxes C means that the citizens of North Carolina will bear the cost of these services to businesses, whether or not we use the products or services produced. We will also subsidize the sale of their products and services to consumers outside of our state and country.

Essentially, the legislature creates a pseudo “corporate welfare” while effectively raising taxes for all citizens contrary to the political posture they have taken to reduce taxes.

With our poor performance in public education, worker health and safety, environmental protection and roads, our lawmakers may need to reconsider their priorities. Our elected officials are expected to represent all of us once elected and to put the public good ahead of personal interests, partisan goals or lobbyists’ causes.

Tim Dixon, Garner

DHS Manager

Regarding “Gouv. Cooper’s next choice to lead the North Carolina Department of Health? ” (1st December) :

Can you imagine making a non-lawyer the attorney general? What an uproar there would be. However, it’s fine for someone who isn’t a doctor to be the head of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. Everyone is an expert these days, even if they didn’t go to medical school. Just search on Google.

Dr Christopher Paul Fleming, Cary

Marc robinson

Our lieutenant governor shouldn’t look in the rearview mirror too much, otherwise he will see that the hatred he spits on our LGBTQ community was once directed at his community just for the color of his skin. I would also add that his good old GOP buddies were among the worst culprits of this hatred. Hate never wins.

Jim Morris, Raleigh

Robinson poll

I recently received a survey from Lieutenant Governor Mark Robinson called the “Weaverville Area Policy Impact Survey”. It contained enlightening yes or no questions such as, “Do you believe the government should have the power to stop Americans from celebrating Thanksgiving and Christmas with their friends and family?” “” And “Are you in favor of biological men participating in women’s sports competitions, and vice versa?”

There were 11 other ridiculous and inflammatory questions in the investigation. Few of them had anything to do with the issues facing our state government.

I have a question for Robinson: will you personally commit to evidence-based governance instead of focusing on outrageous and absurd nonsense, yes or no? I guess we already know his answer.

Scott Shuford, Weaverville

Johnston Schools

Re “Some black students say they are racially bullied in schools in Johnston County” (November 24)

Black students have reported several incidents of racial bullying at various public schools in Johnston County. County commissioners recently withheld $ 7.9 million in funding until the school board passed a policy preventing the teaching of what the commissioners called “critical race theory.”

The county and principals chosen to spend my tax dollars and educate children in my community could learn important lessons from Project 1619 and whatever “critical race theory” may be.

Racism is a permanent part of our history and our lives today. The events in our schools and the attitudes of the trustees and the school board shame us all and create an atmosphere in the community that we should fear and oppose.

Cliff Mitchell, Selma

Building families

It’s time to take the Build Back Better Act seriously. The next child tax credit payment will be on December 15 and if Build Better is not passed, it will be the last payment.

Social programs of the 1950s contributed to family growth, which contributed to economic growth. According to a Pew Research Center survey released last month, 17% of non-parents aged 18 to 49 do not want to have children because of financial problems.

Extending child tax credits for another year, extending the labor income tax credit, adding 300,000 new housing vouchers for low-income tenants, as well as paid family leave, can help families moving forward – an important building block for a stronger economy.

I applaud the recent passage of the infrastructure bill. Now is the time to focus on other things this country values ​​- families and children – as well as Building Back Better.

Patti Maxwell, Cary

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