close

Legislature

Legislature

Lawmakers and state agencies attempt to ‘ensure sustainability’ of school mental health program

Montana officials said this week they had found a solution to fund a school mental health program that had been on shaky ground for more than a year. It is still unclear how many schools will be able to continue the program.

State legislature and state agencies have tried to resolve the funding problem to keep the children’s mental health program afloat after a federal agency said schools were not meeting standards. federal payment.

Schools are responsible for covering about one-third of the cost of using the comprehensive school and community treatment program, which is funded by Medicaid. The service connects students with severe emotional disorders with mental health care providers.

On Wednesday, the state health department and the Montana Bureau of Public Education announced they had created a plan to “ensure the sustainability” of the program.

Schools have received new guidelines on how to fund the service for students, but it is still subject to federal review. The program was transferred from the Ministry of Health to the Ministry of Education for monitoring.

Jay Phillips of OPI told lawmakers it is difficult to say how many schools will be able to pay their share for the program under the new model.

“You know, every school district at the local level will have its own challenges,” he says.

The Legislature allocated approximately $ 2 million last spring as bridge funding for the program. Over $ 400,000 has been spent. Phillips says he hopes the state will have a better idea of ​​which school districts are able to pay for mental health service by the end of October.


Source link

read more
Legislature

Moss Point Hosts Community Meeting to Discuss Future Project Proposals at State Legislature

MOSS POINT, Mississippi (WLOX) – The River City has been the home of Charlie Myles for 75 years and now Myles says his voice is finally heard.

“To be able to listen to things [Mayor Billy Knight] has to say, as well as being able to offer my opinion on the things he’s trying, because that’s never happened before, ”Myles said.

During a two-hour meeting on September 22, around 30 residents and city leaders asked the mayor about the list of projects. One of them was from Richard Young, who says he wishes to see a more finance-conscious approach to improvement projects.

“What are we going to do? How do we fix this problem and not waste money year after year?” Young asked.

The meeting also consisted of discussions regarding potential projects that will be presented to state legislatures for funding. Mayor Billy Knight said the projects included drainage and sewage improvements, rebuilding the Parks and Recreation Department, improving public safety with additional fire trucks and repairing city buildings. .

These are all plans Myles says he’s excited to see for the future of River City.

“We leave here tonight confident that Mr. Knight and his team are able to take all the energy and questions given to him tonight and create a very fruitful tree for the town of Moss Point.” , Myles said.

Knight says that at the top of the list of projects are infrastructure improvements. He plans to submit all project ideas in November.

“This will give them time to look at it, to start laughing at it, so when they bring it to the committee, they’ll all understand what we want,” Knight said. “They have time to call us to ask questions if they have a question. So we just want to give it to them so they don’t have to rush.

Copyright 2021 WLOX. All rights reserved.


Source link

read more
Legislature

Cayuga County Legislative Candidates Debates Begin This Week | State and regional






Cayuga County Legislative Assembly District 12 candidates Tricia Ottley Kerr and Thomas Adessa answer questions during a 2019 televised forum at Cayuga Community College.


Kevin Rivoli, The Citizen


Citizen staff

Candidates for two of the six races contested in the Cayuga County Legislature in 2021 are expected to participate in televised forums this week hosted by Cayuga Community College.

At 7 p.m. on Tuesday, September 28, Spectrum Channel 12 will broadcast a debate with candidates from District 1 of the Legislative Assembly, which includes the towns of Sterling and Victory. Democrat Caitlyn Augustyn is running against Republican James Basile for a two-year term replacing Tucker Whitman, who is not running for reelection due to the term limits in the county.

This forum will also air at 8 p.m. Thursday, September 30 on the same channel and at 5 p.m. Saturday, October 2 and Sunday, October 3 on Spectrum channels 12 and 98 and Verizon channel 31, via Auburn Regional Media Access Wire.

At 7 p.m. Thursday, September 30, on Spectrum 12, a debate featuring the three candidates for District 3 of the Legislative Assembly will be broadcast. Outgoing Democrat Ben Vitale is running for reelection and is being challenged by Republican Lydia R. Pattie Ruffini and Tory Jeffrey Emerson for a two-year term. The district includes the towns of Mentz, Montezuma and Throop

Reruns of this forum are scheduled for 8 p.m. Tuesday, October 5 on Spectrum 12, and 6 p.m. Saturday, October 2 and Sunday, October 3 on Spectrum channels 12 and 98 and Verizon channel 31, via Stream d access to Auburn regional media.


Source link

read more
Legislature

Will the Oregon legislature have a quorum for the redistribution on Monday?

A handful of senators spoke to the Oregon State Senate on Monday, September 20, 2021, as the Oregon Legislature held a special session to consider the redistribution. The goal of the session is to adopt new legislative and congressional district maps for the state to use for elections.

Andrew Selsky / AP

Oregon House Republicans did not show up for a floor session on Saturday, thwarting attempts by the majority Democrats to pass new political maps before a looming deadline.

The absence of GOP lawmakers denied a quorum in the House, meaning there weren’t enough members present to officially begin work. Democratic House Speaker Tina Kotek has announced that the House will adjourn until 9 a.m. on Monday. If enough Republicans haven’t shown up by 9:30 a.m., Kotek said, the session will end.

Related: Oregon House Republicans boycott redistribution session, claim cards are unfair

The Legislature has until the end of Monday to participate in the once-a-decade work of redrawing the state’s legislative and legislative constituencies in accordance with new U.S. census figures. This year’s redistribution includes a new sixth seat in the United States House for Oregon, which gained political clout in the last census.

If they miss the deadline, the task of redrawing the maps of Congress will fall to a panel of five retired Oregon Supreme Court justices, and Democratic Secretary of State Shemia Fagan will be tasked with redrawing the cards. legislative districts of the state.

Republicans are upset that Democratic House Speaker Tina Kotek earlier this week rescinded a deal she made with them to divide power in the redistribution debate, even though Democrats have a large majority in the Senate and the House.

Saturday’s scheduled session followed a three-day hiatus due to a COVID-19 case at the Capitol in Salem.

On Saturday morning, Kotek unveiled a new congressional card proposal that some say would bring House Republicans back to the negotiating table. This proposal places the newer congressional district south of Portland and primarily east of Interstate 5, as in a previous plan. But it makes several changes to the proposed boundaries of other congressional districts, including keeping Portland and Bend in separate districts instead of combining them.

But it was not enough for the House to reach the quorum of 40 members required to vote on the issue.


Source link

read more
Legislature

Montana Legislature Recovers Co-Equality Status | 406 Politics

“I haven’t found much appetite for this in the conversations I’ve had with colleagues,” Abbott said. “I think right now we can do the job to stay informed, monitor and adjust as needed.”

Blasdel also said it was not clear what the future might bring.

“There is still a mixture of feelings about it, although there are valid points to be made,” said Blasdel. “I think we should really gain the trust of the public.”

There are many benefits to generate some interest: a legislature more agile to respond to emerging issues, such as a global pandemic that sends billions in federal aid to the state or a breathtaking fire season; separate sessions to focus only on policy and budget; a more pronounced visibility and an oversight on the other branches.






The Montana State Capitol building in Helena.


THOM BRIDGE, Independent Disc


But the Legislature claims some credibility as a citizen Legislature, rather than a population of professional politicians. The move to annual sessions could also change the demographics of candidate for election – it may be easier for young people to get involved in shorter annual sessions than an extended biennial session.

Lawmakers passed Senate Bill 310 in 2019 which, among other elements, required the Legislative Council to consider annual sessions and make a recommendation to the Legislature. In early 2020, however, the COVID-19 pandemic set in and the study largely fell to the side.


Source link

read more
Legislature

Racial Education Bills Gain Strong Legislature Turnout, Most Urgent Opposition

The two bills that would change the way racial issues are taught in schools appeared this week before an Ohio House committee, and the overwhelming majority of citizen speakers wanted the proposed legislation to be removed.

Bills 322 and 327 were submitted to the committee for consideration on Wednesday, and Republicans amended HB 322 to specifically target K-12 education by banning “concepts of division” which they claim. them, oppose one race to another or explain history in a way that “accuses” any race to oppress others.

According to State Representative Shane Wilkin, R-Hillsboro, the two amendments with “clear language” specified the Ohio State Board of Education and the State Department of Education as the state agencies overseeing the provisions of the bill. , which excludes the Ohio Department. higher education, thereby exempting colleges and universities from regulation.

Another amendment discussed at the House State & Local Government Committee meeting broadened the types of classes where the provisions of HB 322 would apply, making the prohibitions on “division subjects” apply to all instructions. , instead of being limited to subjects like social studies or the US government.

Another amendment discussed at the House State & Local Government Committee meeting broadened the types of classes where the provisions of HB 322 would apply, making the prohibitions on “division subjects” apply to all lessons. , instead of just topics like social studies or the US government.

State Representative Brigid Kelly D-Cincinnati asked Wilkin a question about the amendments, specifically part of the amendments that would prohibit any teacher from authorizing credit for lobbying or acting on issues. public policy issues.

State Representative Brigid Kelly D-Cincinnati asked Wilkin a question about the amendments, specifically part of the amendments that would prohibit any teacher from allowing credit for lobbying or acting on issues. public policy issues.

Kelly spoke of examples of fourth-graders who have come to the Statehouse to lobby for state butterfly designations or other ceremonial but educational civic issues.

Kelly spoke of examples of fourth-graders who have come to the Statehouse to lobby for state butterfly designations or other ceremonial but educational civic issues.

“I’m just wondering if this amendment would ban things like that, because it’s advocacy for public policy and lobbying,” Kelly said.

“I’m just wondering if this amendment would ban things like that, because it’s advocacy for public policy and lobbying,” Kelly said.

Wilkin responded to Kelly by saying “I don’t think that would apply” to these circumstances.

Wilkin responded to Kelly by saying “I don’t think that would apply” to these circumstances.

“I hadn’t thought about the fourth graders… who got on the butterfly bill,” Wilkin said.

“I hadn’t thought about the fourth graders… who got on the butterfly bill,” Wilkin said.

Committee chair Scott Wiggam of R-Wayne County stepped in to confirm that the bill prohibits granting school credits for lobbying or policy advocacy.

Committee chair Scott Wiggam of R-Wayne County stepped in to confirm that the bill prohibits granting school credits for lobbying or policy advocacy.

With further questions about how the political advocacy element of the amendment would impact students, Wiggam asked Wilkin to withdraw the broadening of topics amendment.

With further questions about how the political advocacy element of the amendment would impact students, Wiggam asked Wilkin to withdraw the broadening of topics amendment.

The amendment designating the ODE and the public school board as state agencies overseeing the proposed legislation was added to the bill along party lines.

The amendment designating the ODE and the public school board as state agencies overseeing the proposed legislation was added to the bill along party lines.

A few supporters of the bills came to a previous hearing on the two bills, but on Wednesday dozens of speakers gave their opinion.

A few supporters of the bills came to a previous hearing on the two bills, but on Wednesday dozens of speakers gave their opinion.

Members of the state teachers’ unions, the Ohio Council for Social Studies, the Athens Asian American Alliance, the Ohio Poverty Law Center and the ACLU opposed the bills, as well that in a new coalition called “Honesty for Ohio Education,” all had members represented against the measures.

Members of the state teachers’ unions, the Ohio Council for Social Studies, the Athens Asian American Alliance, the Ohio Poverty Law Center and the ACLU have opposed the bills, as well that in a new coalition called “Honesty for Ohio Education,” all had members represented against the measures.

Coalition member Akii Butler, who is also a member of the Ohio Student Association, was convinced enough by the bills to run online workshops and help launch over 1,000 letters against the theory bills. racial.

Coalition member Akii Butler, who is also a member of the Ohio Student Association, was convinced enough by the bills to run online workshops and help launch over 1,000 letters against the theory bills. racial.

“They make the discussion of these so-called ‘divisive concepts’ – race, religion, sex and more – appear to be an attack on students,” Butler said in a statement. “As if talking about the true history of America somehow hurts students when in fact teaching them the full history of this country can only help them.”

“They make the discussion of these so-called ‘divisive concepts’ – race, religion, sex and more – appear to be an attack on students,” Butler said in a statement. “As if talking about the true history of America somehow hurts students when in fact teaching them the full history of this country can only help them.”

The hearings took place the day after protests from both sides of the issue flooded the steps of the ODE as the State Board of Education held its September meeting. On the one hand, a “re-reading” of black writers and anti-racist literature proclaimed support for teaching about race as an impact on society and history.

The hearings took place the day after protests from both sides of the issue flooded the steps of the ODE as the State Board of Education held its September meeting. On the one hand, a “re-reading” of black writers and anti-racist literature proclaimed support for teaching about race as an impact on society and history.

On the other hand, members of anti-racial theory groups have spoken out against what they called “Marxist” indoctrination of children, calling critical race theory, they say, to be. taught in state public schools as an attack on the ability of students to achieve an equal education. .

On the other hand, members of anti-racial theory groups have spoken out against what they called “Marxist” indoctrination of children, calling critical race theory, they say, to be. taught in state public schools as an attack on the ability of students to achieve an equal education. .

Some members of the State Board of Education support bills banning racial theory in schools and have themselves spoken out in previous committee hearings. Council members who see racial discussions in education as a threat to student education have even asked the Ohio attorney general for an opinion on a resolution condemning racism passed by the council in July.

Some members of the state board of education support bills banning racial theory in schools and have themselves spoken out in previous committee hearings. Council members who see racial discussions in education as a threat to student education have even asked the Ohio attorney general for an opinion on a resolution condemning racism passed by the council in July.

None of the bills were passed on Wednesday, and Wiggam said the commission planned to hold further hearings in the coming weeks.

None of the bills were passed on Wednesday, and Wiggam said the commission planned to hold further hearings in the coming weeks.


The Ohio Capital Journal, an independent, non-profit news organization, connects the people of Ohio with their state government and its impact on their lives. The Capital Journal combines Ohio State government coverage with relentless investigative journalism; delve deep into the consequences of politics; political acumen; and progressive, principled commentary. The Ohio Capital Journal is part of States Newsroom, a national 501 (c) (3) nonprofit supported by grants and a coalition of donors and readers.


Source link

read more
Legislature

The IUP panel on vaccines, political decorum, and how the legislature will approach President Biden’s term – ABC4 Utah

The IUP panel on vaccines, political decorum and how the legislature will approach President Biden’s term

New /

How the state legislature addresses suicide in Utah

New /

Midday COVID Wave Update

New /

Utah nears 3,000 COVID-19 deaths

New /

FOCUS Discussion: September COVID-19 Update

New /

4:30 Update of the missing Ogden man

New /

Hurricane PD searches construction sites for burglars, stealing 50,000 tools

New /

Children under construction – Food allergies in children

New /

OTIS NEWS!

New /

Utah’s Most Accurate Forecast with Chief Meteorologist Alana Brophy

New /

COVID booster shots available for some

New /

Living the Dream EP 26

New /


Source link

read more
Legislature

Yes, the GOP-controlled legislature has “refused to act on at least 150” people appointed by Evers

Political outcry over the chairman of the state’s Natural Resources Council, who refused to leave his seat after his term expired in May, grabbed headlines as well as legal proceedings.

Frederick Prehn was appointed to the board of directors in May 2015 by former Gov. Scott Walker, a Republican. Prehn’s refusal to resign – coupled with the GOP-controlled Senate refusing to consider a replacement – effectively prevented a person appointed by Democratic Gov. Tony Evers from taking the seat.

It is against this backdrop that Democratic lawmakers denounced the GOP’s inaction against those named by Evers.

“We have a GOP-controlled legislature that is so power-hungry that it allows the head of the Natural Resources Council to sit months after his term expires and refuses to vote on the seat of his replacement,” he said. said Sen. Chris Larson, D. -Milwaukee, tweeted on September 10, 2021. “In fact, they refused to act on at least 150 people named by Evers.”

Senate Republicans plan to take action on September 28, 2021 on two of the Evers cabinet members who have been waiting for a confirmation vote for nearly three years. The two, Department of Transportation Secretary Craig Thompson and Dawn Crim, who heads the Department of Safety and Professional Services, are among a list of 39 appointments that Senate leaders plan to vote on Tuesday when the Legislative Assembly will convene both chambers.

The Natural Resources Board dust-off has been well documented, with the latest development occurring on September 17, 2021 when a Dane County judge rejected an attempt by Attorney General Josh Kaul to remove Prehn from the Natural Resources Board.

But what about the second part of Larson’s statement? We are well past half of Evers’ term. Has the GOP-controlled legislature refused to act on at least 150 appointees?

Lists of appointees

When asked for backup, Larson staff sent PolitiFact Wisconsin a list of appointments that had not yet been confirmed as of August 19, 2021. At that time, the list had 157 names.

Britt Cudaback, the governor’s director of communications, provided the same list, and noted that many are high-level or cabinet-level positions. A selection includes:

  • Joaquin Altoro, Executive Director of the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority

  • Dawn Crim, Secretary of the Department of Security and Professional Services

  • Missy Hughes, Secretary and CEO of the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation

  • Amy Pechacek, Secretary of the Workforce Development Department

  • Randy Romanski, Secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Commerce, and Consumer Protection

  • Craig Thompson, Secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Transportation

  • Karen Timberlake, Secretary of the Department of Health Services

  • Hector Colón, Board of Regents of the UW System

  • John Tate II, Chairman of the Parole Board

Of course, the list also includes Sandra Dee Naas, Evers’ selection for the Natural Resources Board. The rest of the no-action list includes appointees to the Wisconsin Election Commission, the Civil Service Commission, and a host of other boards, bodies and positions.

We checked with the non-partisan Legislative Reference Bureau, which, as of September 10, 2021, had 163 appointments awaiting confirmation – more than what Larson cited. The office told us it was not tracking statistics that would compare those appointed by the state of Evers with other governors in the first term.

Granted, in many cases the people appointed by Evers function in their roles. For example, department heads are in place and have the word “interim” or “interim” in their titles.

And Republicans have acted on many Evers 2021 nominations. The list of those nominated by Evers in 2021 contains around 250 names.

Republicans in the Senate have delayed confirmation of nominations for some Evers, in some cases creating political leverage because once cabinet secretaries are confirmed they cannot be removed by the legislature.

Proposed legislation

Democratic state senators Tim Carpenter and Lena Taylor of Milwaukee and Janis Ringhand of Evansville have introduced a measure that would set deadlines for the Senate to act on appointments.

A note from lawmakers, dated September 8, 2021, notes: “Of the appointments made by Governor Evers since January 2019, more than 150 are still awaiting confirmation from the Senate. Among them, 104 of them waited more than 100 days without confirmation. Several have not received a confirmation since January 25, 2019 – 957 days later. ”

He calls inaction a “breach” of his duties and argues that 100 days is “more than enough” to consider and vote on the nominations.

An analysis from the Legislative Reference Bureau stated that current Senate rules require that nominations be referred to “the standing committee which the President (of the Senate) considers to be the most appropriate committee to convey the candidate’s qualifications” and that the committee “Must report its findings and written recommendations to the Senate.”

But no deadline is specified.

The Democrats’ proposal says that an appointment must go back to committee within 10 days, the committee must act within 50 days, and the Senate must consider the matter within 40 days.

Larson’s office said if the Senate didn’t act, nothing would happen. Since it is not clear in the law whether the legislature has any authority over the rules of the Senate, the change that Carpenter and others are proposing is simply an amendment to the rules of the Senate, not the law of the Senate. State. So the majority party, even if the rule change were passed, would still have control over what would happen if Senate rules were broken.

Our decision

Larson said the GOP-controlled legislature had “refused to act on at least 150” people appointed by Evers.

He provided a list of 157 names. The Legislative Reference Office said a more updated tally brought the number to 163.

For a statement that is accurate and that nothing important is missing, our rating is True.



Source link

read more
Legislature

5 bills the Michigan state legislature should pay attention to: September 2021

The following article explains five bills that were introduced, passed, or enacted by the Michigan State Legislature or Governor Gretchen Whitmer during the month of September.

On the second and fourth Friday of each month, the Michigan Daily publishes a compilation of bills introduced to the Michigan State Legislature for use by University of Michigan students.

1. A bill decriminalizing psychedelics

Senate Bill 631

Status: Introduced to Michigan Senate

State Senator Jeff Irwin, D-Ann Arbor, introduced a bill this month in the Michigan Senate to decriminalize two plants and fungi found in psychedelics: psilocybin and mescaline.

The bill would allow the possession, cultivation and delivery of these two substances while maintaining their commercial production and sale prohibited. However, specialists could charge clients if psychedelics are used in counseling, spiritual guidance, or a related service.

Irwin’s introduction of the bill comes a year after Ann Arbor City Council passed a resolution decriminalizing psychedelics. Ann Arbor also declared September Entheogenic Plant and Fungus Awareness Month.

The bill was also introduced ahead of the first Entheofest, an event held on the Diag celebrating and calling for the decriminalization of herbal remedies and mushrooms in Ann Arbor and the United States.

The bill was referred to the Committee on Justice and Public Safety.

2. Legislation reforming school disciplinary procedures

Senate Bills 634, 635 and 636

Status: Introduced to Michigan Senate

Irwin also introduced and co-sponsored legislation to reform the disciplinary process in schools alongside State Senators Erika Geiss, D-Taylor and Adam Hollier, D-Detroit, last week.

The aim of the package is to mitigate the long-term effects of Michigan’s zero tolerance policy on school discipline which was instituted in the 1990s and finally dropped in 2016. The policy was found to affect in some way disproportionately students of color and students with disabilities.

Senate Bill 634 would establish that students could appeal their expulsions and, pending an appeal process, would still have the option of keeping abreast of their class work.

Senate Bill 635 establishes due process for students who face disciplinary action. The law sets up an independent decision-maker to decide whether and in what form a student should be disciplined.

Senate Bill 636 makes additions to the seven factors that must be considered when a student faces disciplinary action. The additions revolve around the student’s living situation and ensure that they are taken into account when faced with disciplinary measures.

3. Bills Establishing Grants for Crisis Intervention and Diversion Programs

Senate Bills 637 and 638

Status: Introduced to Michigan Senate

Senate Bills 637 and 638, introduced by State Senators Stephanie Chang, D-Detroit, and Rick Outman, R-Six Lakes, respectively, create grants for the creation or expansion of community programs d ‘crisis and prison intervention in municipalities.

Chang’s bill, SB 637, would allow community crisis intervention clinicians or peer responders to help defuse emergencies that include a person with mental illness.

SB 638 would provide grants to communities to create prison diversion programs for people with mental illness to participate in as an alternative to prison.

Mental illness affects approximately 23% of Michigan’s prison population. It was found that $ 95,000 was spent per year per prisoner with mental illness, compared to only $ 35,000 per year per prisoner without mental illness.

4. Higher education budget

Bill 4400

Status: Adopted by both chambers, promulgated

The higher education budget bill establishes a budget, separate from the bill describing the overall state budget, specifically targeting higher education.

The bill allocates about $ 2.2 billion of the total state budget for higher education this coming school year, in addition to the $ 17.1 billion in school aid that was part of a deal. budget signed in June.

Michigan colleges and universities will see a 4% funding increase in the 2022 budget in addition to a regular 1% funding increase. Community colleges are expected to receive most of the 1% increase.

The budget includes wording for the vaccine exemption and reporting requirements if a community or college requires vaccines.

5. Fiscal year 2022

Senate Bill 82

Status: Adopted by both chambers, promulgated

Senate Bill 82 includes a number of provisions that will help Michiganders graduate from high school, which has been a long-standing goal for Governor Gretchen Whitmer.

Approximately $ 55 million will go to the Michigan Reconnect Program, $ 25 million for Futures for Frontliners, $ 40 million for Going Pro, and $ 8 million for the Michigan Pre-Apprenticeship Program, which will help Whitmer reach its 60% goal. Michiganders with a post-high school diploma or college diploma by 2030.

$ 500,000 is also included for a reintegration program in Washtenaw County to reduce barriers to employment and housing for residents leaving incarceration.

Washtenaw County District Attorney Eli Savit tweeted about this addition Tuesday night, expressing gratitude to Irwin for pushing for it to be included in the budget.

“This $ 500,000 will go a long way in removing those barriers,” wrote Savit. “I am grateful to @JeffMIrwin for bringing these resources to Washtenaw… Together we will continue to build a more equitable and secure Washtenaw.”

The bill also includes a 2% increase in state revenue sharing for cities, towns, townships and counties in the state of Michigan.

The Department of the Environment, Great Lakes and Energy will see its funding increase 158% to $ 153 million, while the Department of Natural Resources will experience a 4.1% cut in general funds and $ 1. 1% of gross credits.

Whitmer has until September 30 to sign a budget deal to avoid a government shutdown that could have taken place on October 1, the first day of the next fiscal year.
Journalist for the daily Julia Forrest can be contacted at juforres@umich.edu.



Source link

read more
Legislature

Racial Education Bills Gain Strong Legislature Turnout, Most Urging Opposition

The two bills that would change the way racial issues are taught in schools appeared this week in an Ohio House committee, and the overwhelming majority of citizen speakers wanted the proposed legislation to go away.

Bills 322 and 327 were submitted to the committee for consideration on Wednesday, and Republicans amended HB 322 to specifically target K-12 education by outlawing “division concepts” which they claim. them, oppose one race to another or explain history in a way that “accuses” any race to oppress others.

The two amendments with “clear language,” according to state representative Shane Wilkin, R-Hillsboro, specified the Ohio State Board of Education and the state Department of Education as the overseeing state agencies. the provisions of the bill, which excludes the Ohio Department. higher education, thereby exempting colleges and universities from regulation.

Another amendment discussed at the House State & Local Government Committee meeting broadened the types of classes where the provisions of HB 322 would apply, making the prohibitions on “division subjects” apply to all lessons. , instead of being limited to subjects like social studies or the US government.

State Representative Brigid Kelly D-Cincinnati asked Wilkin a question about the amendments, specifically part of the amendments that would prohibit any teacher from allowing credit for lobbying or acting on issues. public policy issues.

Kelly cited examples of fourth-graders who came to the Statehouse to lobby for state butterfly designations or other ceremonial but educational civic issues.

“I’m just wondering if this amendment would ban things like that, because it’s advocacy for public policy and lobbying,” Kelly said.

Wilkin responded to Kelly by saying “I don’t think that would apply” to these circumstances.

“I hadn’t thought about the fourth graders… who got on the butterfly bill,” Wilkin said.

Committee chair Scott Wiggam of R-Wayne County stepped in to confirm that the bill prohibits granting school credits for lobbying or policy advocacy.

With further questions about how the political advocacy element of the amendment would impact students, Wiggam asked Wilkin to withdraw the amendment on broadening topics.

The amendment designating the ODE and the public school board as public bodies overseeing the proposed legislation was added to the bill along party lines.

A few supporters of the bills came to a previous hearing on the two bills, but on Wednesday dozens of speakers gave their opinion.

Members of the state teachers’ unions, the Ohio Council for Social Studies, the Athens Asian American Alliance, the Ohio Poverty Law Center and the ACLU opposed the bills, as well than a new coalition called “Honesty for Ohio Education”. all had members represented against the measures.

Coalition member Akii Butler, who is also a member of the Ohio Student Association, was convinced enough by the bills to run online workshops and help launch over 1,000 letters against the theory bills. racial.

“They make the discussion of these so-called ‘divisive concepts’ – race, religion, sex and more – appear to be an attack on students,” Butler said in a statement. “As if talking about the true history of America somehow hurts students when in fact teaching them the full history of this country can only help them.”

Hearings took place the next day protests on both sides of the issue took over the ODE marches as the State Board of Education held its September meeting. On the one hand, a “re-reading” of black writers and anti-racist literature proclaimed support for teaching about race as an impact on society and history.

On the other hand, members of anti-racial theory groups have spoken out against what they called “Marxist” indoctrination of children, calling critical race theory, they say, to be. taught in state public schools as an attack on the ability of students to achieve an equal education. .

Some members of the State Board of Education are in favor of bills banning racial theory in schools, and spoke about it themselves in previous committee hearings. Board members who see racial discussions in education as a threat to even student education asked the attorney general of Ohio to issue an opinion on a resolution condemning racism adopted by the Board of Directors in July.

None of the bills were passed on Wednesday, and Wiggam said the commission plans to hold further hearings in the coming weeks.

RECEIVE MORNING TICKETS IN YOUR RECEPTION BOX


Source link

read more
1 2 3 4 5 10
Page 3 of 10